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Sam Manymules, Navajo Dine

Biography to Display: 

1963 Born

EDUCATION

Self-taught

 

Samuel Manymules is known for work created using traditional Navajo methods. However, his work reflects his interest in contemporary design. His pieces include large bean pots, melon pots, and dough bowls

Manymules, a Native American potter, was born into the Bitterwater Clan of the Red Horse Nakai Dine Clan. Over the years he held many jobs on the Navajo reservation while at the same time making jewelry and pots. He turned to making pots full time when there were few other jobs available to him. Manymules used images of the work of Joseph Lonewolf and Christine McHorse for inspiration. Only after making many pots did he begin to call himself a potter.

Manymules follows the Navajo tradition of gathering and processing his own clay from local lands. He fires his hand built pieces in a pit fueled with cedar wood which burns at high temperatures. While the pieces are still warm he coats them inside and out with refined pinion tree sap. When cool the pieces are polished with soft cloths until they take on the traditional shine of Navajo pots. 

 

 

Typical Marks
Pinon Pinch Spiral Pot
Materials: Earthenware
Method: Pinched, Coiled, Carved
Surface Technique: Burnished
Crocker Art Museum, Crocker Art Museum purchase with funds provided by Loren G. Lipson, M.D.
Crocker Art Museum, Crocker Art Museum purchase with funds provided by Loren G. Lipson, M.D.

Citation: "The Marks Project." Last modified October 5, 2019. http://www.themarksproject.org:443/marks/manymules