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James Lovera

Biography to Display: 

1920Born

2015 Died

EDUCATION

UnknownCalifornia School of Fine Arts, San Francisco, California

 

James Lovera’s fascination with the bowl form led him to produce a large focused body of work. Early on he spent time with Margurete Wildenhain at Pond Farm, California. Lovera credits Wildenhain's work ethic as an important influence on his studio practice. He used porcelain to throw his perfect paper thin walled pieces that flare out from a tiny ring foot. The types of glazes he used are direct opposites although both reference the natural world he saw around him. They can range from the textural crater glazes for which he is perhaps most well-known to glossy Asian inspired glazes in vivid colors. 

Public Collections

Public Collections to Display: 

Arizona State University Art Museum, Tempe, Arizona

Crocker Museum, Sacramento, California

Helsinki Museum of Applied Arts, Helsinki, Finland

Los Angeles County Museum of Art,  California

Mesa Arts Center, Mesa, Arizona

The Mint Museum, Charlotte, North Carolina

Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design,  Providence, Rhode Island

Museum of Contemporary Ceramics, Shigaraki, Japan

National Museum of History, Republic of China, Taipei, Taiwan

Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, Utah State University, Logan, Utah

Oakland Museum of California, Oakland, California

Victoria and Albert Museum, London, England

Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum,Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri

Bibliography

Bibliography to Display: 

Brown, Claudia and Robert D. Mowry. Ancient China-Modern Clay: Chinese Influences on Five Ceramic Artists. Phoenix, AZ: Phoenix Art Museum, 1994.

Lovera, James. Craters from Fire: Ceramics of James Lovera. Sacramento, CA: Crocker Art Museum, 2006.

Lynn, Martha Drexler. Clay Today: Contemporary Ceramists and Their Work. San Francisco, CA: Chronicle Books, 1990.

Moore, Eudorah M., Suzanne Baizerman, Jo Lauria and Toni Greenbaum. California Design: The Legacy of West Coast Craft and Style. San Francisco, CA: Chronicle Books, 2005. 

Peterson, Susan. The Craft and Art of Clay. New York, NY: Prentice Hall, 1995.

 

 

Typical Marks
1953
1950-1955
1960
ca 1995
Black and White Pot
Date: 1953
Form: Pot
Materials: Earthenware
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Slip, Slip Trailing
The Forrest L. Merrill Collection
The Forrest L. Merrill Collection
Biomorphic Tray
Date: 1950-1955
Form: Tray
Materials: Earthenware
Method: Hand Built
Surface Technique: Glaze
E. John Bullard Collection
E. John Bullard Collection
Bottle
Date: 1960
Form: Bottle
Materials: Earthenware
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
Everson Museum of Art Collection, Purchase gift of the Canadian Guild of Potters, 21st Ceramic National, 1960
Photo: John Polak
Everson Museum of Art Collection, Purchase gift of the Canadian Guild of Potters, 21st Ceramic National, 1960
Photo: John Polak
Bowl
Date: ca 1995
Form: Bowl
Materials: Porcelain
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
Photo: Loren Maron
Photo: Loren Maron
Bowl
Form: Bowl
Materials: Earthenware
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
Photo: TMP
Photo: TMP
Photo: TMP

Citation: "The Marks Project." Last modified June 4, 2018. http://www.themarksproject.org:443/marks/lovera