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Vivika Heino, Vivien Heino, Vivien Place, Otto Heino

Biography to Display: 

1910Born Caledonia, New York

1950Vivien (Vivika) Place and Otto Heino marry

1995Died Ojai, California

EDUCATION

1928-1931Rochester Normal School, Rochester, New York

1932-1933BA Fine Arts, Colorado College of Education, Greeley, Colorado

1939-1940California School of Fine Arts, San Francisco, California

1940Summer School, University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles, California

1942-1944MFA and Teaching Fellowship, New York State College of Ceramics, Alfred University, Alfred, New York

APPRENTICESHIPS AND RESIDENCIES

1934-1935Weaving, Swedish Applied Arts, San Francisco, California

1934-1938Woodcarving, bookbinding and jewelry apprenticeships

1939-1940Appreticeship with Manuel Jalanovitch, San Francisco, California

PRIMARY WORK EXPERIENCE

1940-1942Studio Potter, San Francisco, California

 1944-1945Ceramics Technician, Choate Pottery, Phoenixville, Pennsylvania

1945-1947Pottery Instructor, Greenwich House Settlement, New York, New York

1947-1949Assistant Director, League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, Concord, New Hampshire

1948-1952Studio Potter, Hopkinton, New Hampshire

1952-1955Visiting Lecturer, USC

1955-1963Head of Ceramics Department, Chouinard Art Institute, Los Angeles, California

1963-1965Head of Ceramics Department, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island

1966-1968Master of Ceramics, Sheridan School of Design, Port Credit, Ontario, Canada

1970-1972Established Ceramic Department, New England College, Henniker, New Hampshire

1973-1995Studio Potter, The Pottery, Ojai, California

 

Together with her husband, Otto Heino, Vivika Heino made traditional, thrown vessel forms decorated with rich surface glazes. For nearly 50 years the Heino’s worked together in a shared workshop both throwing and glazing their own works and working collaboratively. Independently, Vivika threw and glazed smaller and mid-sized objects. She became known for glaze calculations and developing new glazes. 

Born Vivien Place in Caledonia, New York she set out to pursue her artistic career by moving to Colorado and eventually California. While working at Swedish Applied Arts in San Francisco, she changed her name to Vivika. Vivika worked as a puppeteer, weaver, bookbinder and jeweler. After just one night course in clay with Manuel Eugene Jalanivich at the California Institute of Fine Arts she decided to pursue a career as a potter.

Vivika next became Glen Lukens’ studio assistant at the University of Southern California. There she learned glazing and firing techniques to supplement the throwing skills she had mastered with Jalanivich. With Lukens’ recommendation, Vivika went to Alfred as a teaching assistant and to finish her MFA. She experimented and consistently developed new clay bodies and innovative finishing techniques including glazes and stains.

After finishing her degree at Alfred in 1944, Vivika set up her own pottery studio in New York’s Greenwich Village and headed the ceramics department at a settlement house, Greenwich House.

After two years in New York City, Vivika applied to the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen a new position. A vacancy became available after potters Edwin and Mary Scheier left. While teaching there, she met her future husband and partner Otto Heino. Otto had returned from military service in Europe during World War II and, signed up for pottery classes under the G.I. Bill.

Married in 1950, the Heino’s quickly begin to exhibit their work together at venues including the Currier Gallery. At the time, Otto was primarily making coiled pots and Vivika was making slab built, tall drinking glasses. Every Wednesday Vivika would glaze tiles Otto had prepared for her to test new glazes in the kiln. (Correspondence with Ms.Roberta Griffith, January 2015).

In 1952 Glen Lukens recommended Vivika to replace him during a sabbatical year at USC. The Heino’s moved to California stayed for over a decade, both teaching first at USC and then at the Chouinard Art Institute. In addition to teaching, Vivika and Otto were hired to make 751 pieces for the 1954 film “The Egyptian” and other Hollywood productions.

In 1963 the Heino’s returned to their studio in Hopkinton, New Hampshire. Vivika continued to teach part-time at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) and Otto focused on selling their pottery. Vivika also taught at the Sheridan School of Design in Ontario, Canada and established the Ceramic Department at New England College in Henniker, New Hampshire.

In 1973, they purchased the Ojai, California studio of Beatrice Wood, a friend, former lustre student and potter. The established The Pottery in 1973 and stayed in Ojai as independent studio potters for the remainder of their careers.

The Heino's fired in updraft dual fueled kilns. Gas fired kilns were used for bisque firing. The bisque ware was then glaze fired in kilns that were started with gas. When the wood and salt catenary kilns (80 cu. Ft.) were used, they were started with gas, then finished with gas plus salt or finished with wood plus salt.  For the wood firing the kiln (90 cu. Ft.) was started with gas and finished with wood. The Denver car kiln was for bisque or glaze, and fired with gas (80 cu. ft.). Two smaller gas kilns were used, one was for bisque firing and for special effects (8 cu. ft.), and the other for bisque or glaze (30 cu. ft.). There were two other kilns, one of 100 cu. ft, and a small wood kiln of 27 cu. feet. (Information courtesy of Ms. Roberta Griffith, December 14, 2014)

Together, Otto and Vivika participated in over 200 national and international exhibits, and were awarded many distinctions and recognitions. In 1978, Vivika was appointed to the Apprentice Fellowship Advisory Panel of the National Endowment for the Arts and, in 1991 she was honored as Trustee Emeritus for the American Crafts Council in New York.

An interview with Otto and Vivika Heino conducted March 4, 1981, by Elaine Levin for the Archives of American Art's Oral History Program is available at: http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/interviews/oral-history-interview-otto-and-vivika-heino-13053.

Public Collections

Public Collections to Display: 

Ariana Museum, Geneva, Switzerland

Arizona State University Art Museum, Tempe, Arizona

Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland

Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, New York, New York

Craft and Folk Art Museum, Los Angeles, California

Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, Iowa

Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, New York

Fitchburg Art Museum, Fitchburg, Massachusetts

Fred Jones, Jr. Museum of Art, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma

Hartford Jewish Community Center, Hartford, Connecticut

Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska

Long Beach Museum of Art, Long Beach, California

Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), Los Angeles, California

Memphis College of Art, Memphis, Tennessee

Mills College Art Museum, Oakland, California

Museum of Arts and Design, New York, New York

Newark Museum, Newark, New Jersey

Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, Utah State University, Logan, Utah

St. Paul Gallery, St. Paul, Minnesota

Scripps College, Claremont, California

Southern Highland Craft Guild, Asheville, North Carolina

Tweed Museum of Art, University of Minnesota, Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, Illinois

Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut

Bibliography

Bibliography to Display: 

Carney, Margaret, Val Cushing and Gerry Williams. What You Give Away You Keep Forever: The Vivika and Otto Heino RetrospectiveAlfred, NYSchein-Joseph Museum of Ceramic Art at Alfred University, 1995.

Levin, Elaine. "Otto and Vivika Heino.” Ceramics Monthly. October 1977.

Merrill, Forrest, Vivika Heino and Otto Heino. The Art of Vivika and Otto Heino. Ventura, CA: Ventura County Museum of History & Art, 2005.

Wallace, Kevin V. and Tim Schiffer. The Art of Vivika & Otto Heino. Ventura, CA: Ventura County Museum of History & Art, 1995. 

 

CV or Resume: Click Here to Download
Source: College Archives, New York State College of Ceramics

 

Typical Marks

The mark with a C inside an abstract vase form was used by the Heinos while they were at the Chouinard Art Institute in the 1950s and1960s.

1960
1960
ca 1960
1960-1970
1960-1989
ca 1975
1980-1990
ca 1985
1989
ca 1990
1993
Cookie Jar
Date: 1956
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
Courtesy Elaine Levin Archives University of Southern California
Courtesy Elaine Levin Archives University of Southern California
Covered Jar
Date: 1960
Materials: Stoneware
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
Mr.and Mrs. Fred Marer Collection, 83.2.6, Scripps  College
Photo: TMP
Mr.and Mrs. Fred Marer Collection, 83.2.6, Scripps College
Photo: TMP
Photo: TMP
Photo: TMP
Vase
Date: 1960
Materials: Stoneware
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
Mr.and Mrs. Fred Marer Collection, 83.2.7, Scripps  College
Photo: TMP
Mr.and Mrs. Fred Marer Collection, 83.2.7, Scripps College
Photo: TMP
Photo: TMP
Vase
Date: ca 1960
Materials: Stoneware
Method: Thrown and Altered
Surface Technique: Glaze
Forrest L. Merrill Collection
Forrest L. Merrill Collection
Vase with Bird Heads
Date: 1960s
Materials: Stoneware
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
Forrest L. Merrill Collection
Forrest L. Merrill Collection
Large Bowl
Date: ca 1975
Materials: Stoneware
Method: Thrown
Dimensions: 17 x 11.25"
Surface Technique: Glaze
E. John Bullard Collection
E. John Bullard Collection
Weed Pot with Three Holes
Date: ca 1985
Materials: Stoneware
Method: Thrown and Altered
Dimensions: 4" h.
Surface Technique: Glaze
E. John Bullard Collection
E. John Bullard Collection
Large Apple Ash Bottle
Date: 1980s
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
Photo: Roberta Griffith
Photo: Roberta Griffith
Photo: Roberta Griffith
Paperweight
Date: 1989
Method: Hand Built
Surface Technique: Glaze
Photo: Roberta Griffith
Photo: Roberta Griffith
Vase
Date: ca 1990
Materials: Stoneware
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
E. John Bullard Collection
E. John Bullard Collection
Plate with Bird
Date: 1993
Materials: Stoneware
Method: Hand Built
Surface Technique: Glaze
David B. Allan Collection
Photo: Courtesy E. John Bullard
David B. Allan Collection
Small Vase
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
Photo: Roberta Grifith
Photo: Roberta Griffith
Photo: Roberta Griffith
Vase
Materials: Stoneware
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze, Incised
Forrest L. Merrill Collection
Forrest L. Merrill Collection
Covered Jar
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
Courtesy Treadway Gallery
Courtesy Treadway Gallery

Citation: "The Marks Project." Last modified September 30, 2019. http://www.themarksproject.org:443/marks/heino