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Shalene Valenzuela

Biography to Display: 

1972 Born, Santa Barbara, California

EDUCATION

1994 BA Art Practice, Geography, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California

1997 MFA Ceramics, California College of Arts & Crafts, Oakland, California

RESIDENCIES

2004 Kiln God Summer Residency, Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts, Newcastle, Maine

2006 Summer Residency, Archie Bray Foundation of the Ceramic Arts, Helena, Montana

2007–2009 Long Term Residency, Clay Studio of Missoula, Missoula, Montana

2011 Invited AIA Artist Residency, Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts, Newcastle, Maine

2016 Artist in Residence, LH Project, Joseph Oregon

PRIMARY WORK EXPERIENCE

2000–2007 Gallery Director, Cricket Engine Gallery, Oakland, California

2001–2007 Instructor, Richmond Art Center, Richmond, California

2009–2010 Interim Faculty, Oregon College of Art & Craft, Portland, Oregon

2012– Executive Director, Clay Studio of Missoula, Missoula, Montana

 

Shalene Valenzuela is known for ceramic sculpture of everyday common objects which often reference domesticity. The artist employs the slip casting process to create each piece which is later hand painted and screen-printed. Valenzuela’s brightly colored imagery is often inspired by mid-20th century ideals. The artist’s sculptures typically appear as objects that are coveted by the human condition: sewing machines, kitchen utensils, tools, purses, shoes and much more.

Valenzuela draws inspiration from childhood memories of sifting through photographs and other media that depict idealized mid-20th century life. Oftentimes, this idealization only painted half the picture: Valenzuela deals with these candy-coated themes, revealing a deeper layer that focuses on femininity and the experiences of growing into a woman in such an atmosphere.

About her work, Valenzuela states ‘my exploration of issues addressing self-perception and expectations reach beyond just purely feminist concerns. It’s a question of how we all strive to attain impossible ideals based on what others define we should be.'

From her depiction of mid-20th century ideals to the slip cast objects that form the beginnings of her finished sculptures: Valenzuela herself states that the work ‘isn’t always what it seems to be’. In 2012 Archie Reginald documented a visit to Valenzuela’s studio in which she discusses her work further. The link can be accessed here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TaOl1Jfhpg.

Public Collections

Public Collections to Display: 

Archie Bray Foundation for the Ceramic Arts, Helena, Montana

The Clay Studio of Missoula, Missoula, Montana

Bibliography

Bibliography to Display: 

Fredrickson, Erica. “Life Patterns.” The Missoula Independent, October 11, 2012.

Marquis, Andrea. “Her Story.” Ceramics Monthly (October 2013).

Smith, Nan. 500 Figures in Clay Volume II. New York, NY: Lark Books, 2014.

Susser, Deborah Sussman, “Clay Nation,” Art Ltd Magazine, April 2009.

Taylor, Brian and Kate Doody. Glaze: The Ultimate Collection of Ceramic Glaze, and How They Are Made. New York, NY: Quarto Publishing Group, 2014.

Tourtillott, Suzanne. 500 Plates & Chargers: Innovative Expressions of Function & StyleNew York, NYLark Books, 2008.

Tourtillott, Suzanne and Julie Hale. 500 Ceramic Sculptures: Contemporary Practice, Singular Works. New York, NY: Lark Books, 2009.

Wandless, Paul Andrew. 500 Prints on Clay: An Inspiring Collection of Image Transfer Work. Ashville, NC: Lark Crafts, 2013.

Wandless, Paul Andrew. Image Transfer on Clay: Screen, Relief, Decal & Monoprint TechniquesNew York, NYLark Books, 2006.

Wen Xiong, Lin, “Fun & Games of Life: Works by Shalene Valenzuela.  ”Vision Magazine (April 2007).

Zakin, Richard, and Frederick Bartolovic. Electric Kiln Ceramics: A Guide to Clays, Glazes, and Electric Kilns. Westerville, OH: The American Ceramic Society, 2015.

 

Website: http://www.shalene.com/

 

Typical Marks
2012
2014
2015
2016
Cinched In
Date: 2012
Form: Sculpture
Materials: Porcelain
Method: Cast
Surface Technique: Glaze
The State of Clay, Lexington, MA, 2016
Photo: TMP
The State of Clay, Lexington, MA, 2016
Photo: TMP
Photo: TMP
Dress Form--56" x 14" x 8"
Date: 2012
Form: Sculpture
Materials: Porcelain
Method: Cast
Surface Technique: Glaze, Transfer or Decal Decorated
The State of Clay, Lexington, MA, 2016
Photo: TMP
The State of Clay, Lexington, MA, 2016
Toaster
Date: 2014
Form: Sculpture
Method: Slab Built, Hand Built
Surface Technique: Glaze
Photo: TMP
Photo: TMP
Photo: TMP
Photo: TMP
Blending In Sizing Up
Date: 2015
Form: Sculpture
Materials: Porcelain
Method: Cast
Surface Technique: Glaze
The State of Clay, Lexington, MA, 2016
Photo: TMP
The State of Clay, Lexington, MA, 2016
Photo: TMP
Object of Self Construction~Masques
Date: 2016
Form: Sculpture
Method: Slab Built
Surface Technique: Glaze
The State of Clay, Lexington, MA, 2016
Photo: TMP
The State of Clay, Lexington, MA, 2016
Photo: TMP

Citation: Kuratnick, Jeffrey. "The Marks Project." Last modified November 30, 2017. http://www.themarksproject.org:443/marks/valenzuela